Cat’s Corner

Long serving committee and honorary member Cat Humphries gives us the final instalment of her four part series of her photographic relationship with Pentax & Nikon. Enjoy!






A Back Garden Busk and Decision Time

Lazy Sunday afternoon, there’s no time to worry… I’m sure there’s a song there but the Back Garden Busk crew were more keen on showtunes!

I had a fine afternoon in Chorleywood to compare the Nikon D7500 and a Sigma 70-200mm 2.8 with my trusty Pentax K-5II and a Tamron 70-200mm 2.8. I’d photographed an almost identical socially-distant event two weeks previously so it was ideal to compare how well the two set-ups worked.

Being able to set a minimum shutter speed while in Aperture mode was fantastic compared to Pentax’s Aperture+Time setting. This helped me avoid over-exposing the highlights as the lighting changed and ensured that I was always shooting fast enough to avoid camera shake or blurring movement.

Within minutes I wasn’t thinking about the controls on the Nikon – I was completely in the moment and able to change aperture quickly as the action developed. Although the Pentax has two control dials, the same as the Nikon, the rear control dial is nearer to where you rest your thumb so it’s too easy to change the setting accidentally. I was very pleased with the layout of the dials of the Nikon and felt like I was in control at all times.

The fact that the camera worked like a dream was nothing compared to how I felt when I saw the images in Lightroom. I’d grown used to adding a lot of sharpness to the RAW images from the Pentax – their shallow-focus vintage quality becoming my signature style. The sharpness of the Nikon images was a revelation! So crisp in the focus points, so dreamily soft in the background. Much less forgiving than the Pentax, but satisfying when you got the focus spot-on.

This was it, seeing the images from the day I made my decision to switch to Nikon for my theatre work. I accepted the trade-in quote and boxed up my beloved Pentax gear ready to go.

I must admit, I was quite sad packing up the Pentax kit. It had served me well over the years but as much as it felt like I’d been cheating on it for a younger model, I knew that it would be the right decision. With Pentax heading further out of favour, I would trade-in before it became worthless. And besides, a box full of lenses and a second-hand D7200 is on the way. No turning back now!

There will always be a place in my heart for my Pentax DSLRs… and a place on my shelf for my Pentax MX. Might need to buy another roll of film to go in it. Once a Pentaxian, always a Pentaxian.


Club Night Summary #83

First Competition of the Season!

This week I was reminded we had held 24 online meetings since the Coronavirus came into our lives, causing the lockdown and subsequent loss of our meeting hall for obvious safety reasons.
Thanks to the ‘zoom’ facility we have met every week since March, completing the season, running through the normal summer break and here we are just a few weeks into our new season.

Ironically the last meeting in March held at the community centre was a competition night judged by Martin Patten, who was also our Judge for the first competition of our new season this week.
The competition was an ‘open’ PDI and as always was a closely fought event, with many excellent Images contesting for the highest league points.

Our judge for the evening was also at our ‘Zoom’ online meeting and gave ‘live critique accompanied by constructive comments and tips regarding the entered Images, as he distributed the points and nominated the highest scorers.

An enjoyable night, enabling the membership to enjoy the diverse collection of Images that an ‘open’ competition brings.

Thank you to all that entered the competition, which as always is a great way to measure your own Individual progress during the season with your creative work.


Cat’s Corner

Long serving committee and honorary member Cat Humphries gives us the third instalment of her four part series of her photographic relationship with Pentax Nikon. Enjoy!


First Impressions and Testing Times

Bump! That was me falling back down to earth. The dreams of a Nikon set-up had carried me away, but the cost involved in making the switch soon made me come tumbling down.

One of the things that attracted me to Pentax was the sheer number of lenses available, and the reasonable cost of second-hand gear. Yes, I know the pre-loved kit was because no-one wanted them, but like my two rescue pups, I can’t bear to see things being abandoned.

I’ve been a bit of a magpie when it comes to Pentax gear. My other half always says that you need to use the right tool for the job so over the years I’ve collected many different lenses. The good news at the time was that all of them were bought for a “reasonable” price but now that means that I shouldn’t get my hopes up that they’re worth much.

A quick email to Wex’s trade in department should give me an idea on how much budget I would have. That’ll enable me to make a measured decision on what to do next…

5 minutes later.

… OMG what have I done? Ebay, why did you taunt me so? What happened to self control????

1 day later.

I appear to have in my hands a reconditioned D7500. How did that happen? Things are too easy to buy these days. At least I can return it within 30 days – no quibbles.

1 minute later.

What use is a camera body without a lens? Time to call in reinforcements!

The next day – a sunny Saturday.

Get up early to give the D7500 a test run before breakfast (too excited to lie in!). First impressions; not too heavy, fits well in my hand, dials in all the right places, menus look easy to navigate. Oooooo with this tilting touchscreen you are really spoiling us. Stop it Catherine, don’t let it distract you with it’s fancy new-fangled ways! This is about the images, not its attractiveness. Time to get a lens on it, courtesy of Mr Highet and his Sigma 70-200mmm 2.8 … Hang on, it’s all the wrong way round! It’s like a left-hand-drive car. Feels weird. I’m sure I’ll get used to it eventually?

How does it compare to the old K5II with my Tamron 70-200 2.8 (affectionately known as the big b****er) on it? Not bad. It’s actually very similar in size with the Sigma being a bit heavier than the Tamron, increasing the overall weight by about 200g.

Pentax/Tamron versus Nikon/Sigma

Let’s pop out to the garden for a quick snap before breakfast. Very speedy auto-focus, lovely big screen to check the images on, good sharpness and rich colours. What do you expect outdoors in sunshine with a good bit of glass on it? How about indoors and a black-&-white dog? That’ll test it.

What this needs is a ropey el-cheapo lens… thank you Mr Amazon! Bring on the Tamron 70-300mm Macro, with no HSM, no stabilization and a snail-like F4-5.6. That’s more like it!

Back outdoors and ewwwww the focus is so slow! No chance of catching birds or jets with this one, no matter how much the D7500 tries to catch-up with its 3D tracking. Looks rather soft too but let’s see what Lightroom does with them.

That was quick! Schoolboy error, the Nikon was just in Jpeg mode… must fix that!

Very pleased with the metering on the Nikon. It coped with my dog Kobe’s black and white fur amazingly well, something that the Pentax always struggled with. The Tamron was surprisingly sharp – at f10 at least – but disappointingly soft on the macro shots I tried. This lens will be going back where it came from pronto.

The yellow petals on the sunflower can be tricky to expose too and the Nikon’s done a good job. Comparing the colours on the Tamron and Sigma there is a noticeable difference.

I now have more photos than I will ever need of my neighbours TV aerials, as I tested the focussing speed on far-away objects. Blimey, they’re sharp!

I’m getting to like this Nikon lark. What I need is a socially distant informal gathering to test the D7500 and Sigma lens combination, so I can compare it to an almost identical socially distant informal gathering I photographed but two weeks prior to today…

Next time: A Back Garden Busk and Decision Time


Croxley Green Show

Cat, Ant and Gordon images went down well at the recent Croxley Green Show. Congratulations to each of them!


Dear Exhibitors and Friends of The Croxley Green Show,

PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION 2020

We are delighted to have been able to hold the Photography Competition remotely this year, results and winning photos per class attached.

Thank you to all exhibitors, 17 in total and 67 photos entered.

A big big thank you to our Photography judge who was so thorough in his judging.  He wrote copious notes for the exhibitors with praise and advice. I will be sending the exhibitors his comments shortly.

The Mealor Cup goes to Cat Humphries with a cumulative total of 15 points (3 for a First, 2 for a Second, and 1 for a Third). The quality of her photography across all the classes is extraordinary. She achieved 2 Firsts, 4 Seconds, 1 Third and 1 Commended, amazing!

In Second place is Julie Tollit with 6 points

In Joint Second, Steve Rogers and John Jowers with 5 points.

There were 2 Joint Best in Photography medals awarded to Anthony Highet for his Human Relationships photo and to John Jowers for his Group Scene Photo

We aim to post the winning photos on the website soon.

Once the cup and medals are engraved we will drop them off to you.  The cup needs to be returned before The Spring Show (we will collect it). The medals are yours to keep.

On behalf of the Show Committee, thank you to all of you for supporting The Show.

With best wishes,

John Jowers (Show Secretary)



Cat’s Corner

Long serving committee and honorary member Cat Humphries gives us the second instalment of her four part series of her photographic relationship with Pentax. Enjoy!


Finding a New Way: From Pentax to What?

You’ve had “the talk” and explained how you feel. It’s sad, after all your relationship has been going for several decades, but you know inside that it’s the right decision. Then you find yourself thinking “where next?”. How do you fill the void that has been left behind and start to move on with your life?

I was so committed to Pentax that I hadn’t looked at any other camera manufacturers specifications for a while. A round of speed dating was in order!

Over the years I’ve learnt that I need a camera that’s light and intuitive to use, flexible enough to accompany me on adventures “up hill and down dale” and has enough lenses to keep my genre-crossing creativity engaged. My theatre photography means it needs to be reliable, quick to turn on with fast responses and very good in low-light situations. I also need two bodies, each with a f2.8 lens, so there needs to be a good second-hand price point too.

Mirrorless? Too soon! I may be ready to move on from Pentax but mirrorless is a whole new ball game. Let’s start with little steps shall we? So a DSLR it is. Preferably with a crop sensor to achieve the reach I need with a 200mm lens.

Olympus: Like the bearded hipster in a vegan coffee shop (in a hand-knitted jumper, obviously!), I can see the vintage appeal but four-thirds format is an acquired taste. Small in stature and good for an enjoyable weekend away. Not the serious commitment I’m after.

Sony: Fond of urban exploration and around-the-world trips, this new kid on the block is a bit of a force of nature. It has expensive tastes (you can tell by the designer glasses) but it’s high-quality has seen it grown in popularity over the years so more third party lenses are on the market. Not sure I could keep up with this one, particularly with the expense of needing two bodies.

Canon: Reliable and dependable, this is the one you know will produce good results, a sensible choice. I’ve got friends who have very fulfilling lives with Canon, but as much as I try, we just don’t have that spark and I soon get frustrated with them. I have a history of unfulfilling flings with Canon compact cameras so I don’t think this is the one for me.

Nikon: I’ve always had a soft spot for Nikon with fond memories of my first compact camera. We spent a few years together and went on many adventures, exploring museums, long weekends in the peak district, getting sunburn in March in mid-Wales. I never should have let that one go… Sorry, I drifted off there for a moment! Maybe a Nikon is the way forward.

Let’s examine the specs…

The D7200 and more-recent D7500 look like they would fit the bill. Agile enough for theatre, wildlife and sports. Reliable. Creative in their compatible lenses and open to bringing different lighting options into the relationship. We may be onto a winner but don’t get too excited, we haven’t looked at prices yet – they may be above your price range and you don’t want to commit too soon. Why don’t you have a think and then take a closer look, after all, you wouldn’t want to give up your trusty Pentax unless you were sure.

Next Time: First Impressions and Testing Times.



Club night summary – 10th September

Once again, as a club we have broken new boundaries, as we kicked of our first talk of the new season broadcast live from Georgia. Located at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, to the west is the Black Sea and to the north by Russia.

Our guest speaker James Kerwin is currently living in the capital city of Tbilisi. Through the wonders of the Zoom and the Internet, he was able to give his excellent presentation of ‘Abandoned Architecture’ to our appreciative members at the understandably well attended meeting.

James shared a really well structured presentation with great Images of Abandoned properties, of which he managed to bring out the beauty from decaying structures through his amazing photography and creative Imagination.

During the evening he gave a tremendous amount of Information, from his back photography story, through to the locations he has visited throughout the World. His enthusiasm for the subject was quite infectious and Inspiring.

As photographers we are always looking for stimulus and Inspiration, the evening provided us with a bucket load! from what maybe the furthest placed speaker we will ever have addressing the club.

Although we would all love to be back in our normal meeting hall at the Community centre, there are also benefits from meeting online. Thursday was definitely one of them!

Steve



Cat’s Corner

Long serving committee and honorary member Cat Humphries is kindly writing a blog series on her camera gear experiences. First instalment below – enjoy!


The Last Pentaxian in Croxley

There comes a time in every relationship where you have to assess whether you stay or you go. This is true for camera gear as much as it is for marriages. When you first decide on which camera manufacturer you go steady with, it’s all new and exciting. You’re amazed by the clarity of the images the relationship produces and you go on to add to your family of camera gear.

Suddenly you find yourself 20 years down the line, with a bag (or in my case cupboard) full of lenses, but the manufacturer you supported just isn’t keeping up their part of the bargain. You don’t get excited by them anymore, you know their flaws inside out, and you start to wonder whether they care about what they’re giving back to you. Are you worth more than they’re giving you?

This is how I feel about my relationship with Pentax cameras. They were the first SLR I got my grubby 5 year olds hands on, and I spent my formative years completely in love with my Pentax MX. We travelled the world (well, to Canada anyway), spent hours people watching, going to museums or the occasional Wimbledon final, and we took our first steps into the world of theatre photography together.

Later on, as both of us grew older, the world around us changed. Photography was going digital and in 2007 I took the plunge and bought a K100D. A new world of possibilities opened up. No longer was our relationship constrained to 36 exposures and processing fees. We had the freedom of a 1GB SD card and an A4 printer!

Slowly we evolved together, with new features drawing me deeper into the Pentax DSLR world, the K100D became a K20D and then, as the theatre beckoned me back, the K5II was so alluring with it’s low light processing and faster auto-focus. One body became two, and my collection of lenses grew to ten as I explored new genres and hoped that I could find photographic utopia. My evangelism knew no bounds – the two most popular religions in the imaging world held no allure for me. I would not be a slave to the tribes of Nikon or Canon like those I saw around me.

But like most utopian visions things became dystopian after a few years. The cracks started to show and what was once a great idea had started to turn sour. I searched around for a new body to replace my ever aging K5II, but alas Pentax removed the features I had relied on so much. They raved about their new full-frame cameras, but they were not what I wanted in a relationship. Too big, too heavy and with the same level of focussing options – they couldn’t satisfy my evolving creativity.

All around me lens manufacturers were abandoning the long-established third way. Limiting what was available to loyal Pentaxians like me. We saw our future stretched out before us, not the utopian vision we’d hoped for, but now a dystopian nightmare. Stuck in the past, hampered by unsupported gear and old fashioned lighting kit.

Despair surrounded me like a dark and stormy night, but after a while, the realisation struck me like a ray of light through the clouds. I didn’t have to stay in this sort of relationship. I was worth more than Pentax was giving me. I could be free to choose my future, unchained from the restrictions of the brand I had been loyal to for so long.

I could rebuild my camera gear collection. I could evolve.

Next time: Finding a New Way: From Pentax to What?


Left – Cat’s beloved Pentax MX – which still contained film at the time of writing!

Right – Selection of MX printsclockwise from top left: Venus Williams serving for the Championship at Wimbledon in 2007, couple on Lady Godiva Plinth 1998, Nuneaton Man (whole area was demolished to make way for a shopping centre), Strange Times at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 1998, Swamp Donkey at the Godiva Festival 1998


Club night summary – 3rd September

Another first for the club last week when we held our first virtual ‘Welcome evening’ to herald the start of our new season. It was great to see some new faces and to welcome back some more familiar to our clan of talented photographers. It was a well attended night on ‘Zoom’ (our now well trodden platform for weekly club meetings) with a great atmosphere full of anticipation for the season ahead.

Our brilliant committee carried out a review, which featured a look at the trophy winning Images from last season, External competition Info for the various challenges against other clubs this season. Ant gave us a great preview of his work in portraiture and studio work, accompanied by some stunning Images.

We had a brief look at the coming programme with particular focus on the guest speakers, some of which are experts in their field and live some distance from the club. One of the benefits of ‘Zoom’ gives us access to these speakers, which would not normally be able to travel so far, to deliver their talk. We had a few Important words on finance and some useful reminders on entering competitions with photoentry.

Our summer extended programme was a huge success and we were able to show a few highlights from the various challenge competitions that were held during the summer months. Some excellent Images produced during this period!

All in all a full and enjoyable night with some great relaxed banter from the various members in Zoom boxes displayed on our screens. (How the World has changed!)

Earlier in the evening we reported that following our recent survey and subsequent committee review. We will continue online using Zoom (as most other camera clubs) until such time as we have sufficient confidence that we can safely return to our community centre hall. We will monitor the situation and carry out another survey with all members at the end of October and then share findings early November.

We thank everyone that managed to help us with the survey and as always value your feedback to the club.

Steve


Club night summary – 27th August

Here we are at the start of another season, despite the pandemic we are fit and ready to go once again and looking forward to another successful season. A number of camera clubs have struggled to keep together during these very stressful times, but with the help of ‘Zoom’ the online support and our wonderful committee, we have managed to keep everything going. Not only did we complete our season but we extended the programme into the the summer period, with a lively programme of photography challenges and catch up informal chats, which were always entertaining and produced some great Images from our talented members along the way.

We understand that meeting online isn’t for everyone, but it has been the only alternative when the Coronavirus struck and it has proved a successful formula. We would love all members to embrace this method of meeting to start the new season this Thursday 3rd September. It is very easy and not as daunting as it may appear from the outside. Please contact if you need any help in enabling this to happen, we would be delighted to assist. A warm welcome awaits everyone.

We will announce our season meeting plans this Thursday evening, following the results of the recent survey, which we thank everyone who participated. It was very Important that we gauged everyone’s thoughts regarding physical meetings again. Everyone’s safety is paramount in our thoughts and it is most Important that there is a majority of confidence for when we meet in the hall.

However we meet, you can be assured we will have our normal programme of events from great speakers (experienced experts in their field), workshop evenings and of course Competitions. You can download the programme from below link.
Lots of Inspirational topics for our members creative minds to occupy, while the world gets back to some sort of normality!

Meanwhile our last summer programme session ended last Thursday with a great evening of Informal chat, covering a number of Interesting topics raised by the attending members. Everything from different types of filters filters, Infra red photography including film use, locations for great shots and discussion about Introducing a help/advice format for members. We were even treated to ‘Ant’s’ talk and great Images, regarding his recent Portrait social and the Importance of a planB.

Looking forward to seeing everyone this Thursday for our Welcome evening to start the new and exciting season.

Steve